Posts

Karna, the Courageous

Image
Karna is perhaps the most skilled and valiant warrior in the Kurukshetra war fought between the Kauravas and the Pandavas. Having said that, Karna was also undoubtedly the most ill fated or unluckiest character in the epic Mahabharata.

Bad luck struck him right from the time of his birth. Karna was in fact the eldest of Kunti's (Mother of Pandavas) sons. The story of his birth goes like this - When Kunti was young and still unmarried, the sage Durvasav happened to visit her father's palace. She served the sage with utmost care throughout his stay at the palace for an entire year. Pleased at her hospitality and foreseeing her future that she wouldn't have children after her marriage to Pandu, Durvasav granted her a boon to call upon any God of her choice and beget a child. The sage advised her to use the boon only after her marriage. But out of curiosity and the enthusiasm of her young age she invoked the mantra and called the Sun God. And thus Karna was born. Being the son…

Mahashivratri

Image
Shivratri or Maha Shivratri is a festival celebrated every year on the 13th night of the new moon, during the month of Maagha (as per Shalivahana or Gujarati Vikrama) or Phalguna (as per Vikrama) in the Hindu Calendar (that is, the night before and day of the new moon). The festival is principally celebrated by offerings of Bael (Bilva) leaves to Lord Shiva, all day fasting and an all night long vigil. Ganga is traditionally used as an offering for Lord Shiva and his followers.

Per scriptural and discipleship traditions, the penances are performed in order to gain boons in the practice of Yoga and meditation, in order to reach the goal more swiftly and avoid rebirth.

Now, coming to the story part of it - Once the Devas (dwellers of heaven) came to know about Mrutha Sangivani, which when consumed would give them immortality and strength that would enable them to over power the Asuras (Demons of the underworld) forever. But this magical potion had to be churned out of Palazhi (Sea of m…

Abhimanyu, caught in Chakravyooha...

Image
Abhimanyu is a tragic hero in the Hindu epic Mahabharatha. Born to Arjuna, the best archer and one amoung the Pandavas, and Subhadra, the half sister of Lord Krishna, Abhimanyu is said to be the partial incarnation of the Moon. Legend has it that he, if he had lived enough, would have eclipsed his father as an archer. However, the young lad met with one of the most tragic deaths in the battle of Kurukshethra between the Pandavas and the Kauravas.

As an unborn child in his mother's womb, Abhimanyu learned the technique of entering the deadly and virtually impenetrable Chakravyooha from his uncle, Lord Krishna. It is said so that he overheard Lord Krishna discussing this with Subhadra from the womb. Lord Krishna explains to Subhadra in detail, the technique of attacking and escaping from various vyoohs (an array of army formation) such as Makaravyoha, Kurmavyooha, Sarpavyuha etc. After explaining all the vyoohs, he explains about the technique of cracking Chakravyooha, which is the …

Eklavya

Image
Let me start this story in the good old fashion...

Once up on a time, in the gurukul (a school where a selected number of students stay with their teacher throughout their training period) of Dronacharya, the royal teacher, the Pandavas and Kauravas were practicing archery.

Pandavas are the 5 sons of King Pandu and Kauravas, the 100 sons of King Dhridharashtra. And Arjuna amoung the Pandavas was Drona's most favoured disciple. Arjuna was an excellent marksman and has performed many awe inspiring feats with his bow & arrow, even as a student in the gurukul. Once Drona tied a toy parrot on a tree and marked it's right eye. He then called all his students and gave a bow & arrow to each one of them and asked them to hit the marked eye of the parrot. No one but Arjuna could do it and ever since then, Drona always gave special attention to Arjuna and did everything to foster him as an ace archer. Drona also promised Arjuna to teach him the many tricks and trades of archery …

Ganesha, the courageous

Image
No better way to start this blog. Lord Ganesha, in Hindu mythology is believed to be the God who helps you surpass the hurdles in life. He is otherwise known as Vighneshwara ('Vighn' - hurdle and 'Eshwara' - God). And every devoted Hindu offers a coconut to Vighneshwara before he starts anything new. I, for one, used to offer a coconut to Vighneshwara before I went in to write the many exams in school and in college or before I attend the first day of a new job. Whatever the believes or myths might be, I get a sense of satisfaction on doing so. Isn't it nice that you start doing things on a positive note? Anyways... As the first post in this blog, I'll tell you the most fascinating story about Ganesha which my father told me when I was a kid.

One fine day Lord Shiva went out on an errand telling his wife, Goddess Parvathy that it'd take him a while to return home. Now, these couple have made the Himalayas their home and they lived a free, in-harmony with na…